Jump to Navigation

Features

Annual Backyard Biodiversity Day
Backyard Biodiversity Day
Volunteers make it happen - THANK YOU!
FSYO performs in The Grove
The Great DUCK!
Next Great Duck Derby -- Feb 28, 2015
Young Naturalist Summer Camp
Young Naturalist Summer Camp

News

In Bloom: Partridge pea

Partridge pea (Chamaecrista fasciculata) blooms from summer through late fall, attracting mostly bees and butterflies, although ants are also attracted to its nectar glands. It is the host plant to several species of butterfly, including the gray hairstreak (Strymon melinus) and cloudless sulfur (Phoebis sennae), and its seeds are consumed by birds and other wildlife. 

Come see our new staghorn ferns

A special thank you to Laurie Heatley and her family for their in-kind donations of Platyceriums, also known as staghorn ferns, to the Legacy Garden. Their uniquely shaped fronds can be seen hanging from the large oak trees to the left as you enter the garden from S. Denning Drive.

Volunteer Profile: Bill Frazier

If you’re seeing more and more palms around the garden, we have Bill Frazier to thank for his selective donations! Bill is one of MBG's devoted "Dream Team" volunteers. He joined MBG in 2011 as our first volunteer to work with horticulturalist Randy Knight in restoring the Legacy Garden and Greenhouse. Over the years, he has worked effortlessly at bringing back the gardens and the legacy of T.L. Mead by contributing his own personal collection of palms. 

Thank you to MBG's generous supporters!

The Mead Botanical Garden Trustees give special thanks to the following for their recent plant donations:

Cool-colored Caladiums are popping up everywhere!

The tropical plants show their color during the summer and fall months from June to October.  In 2012, volunteers took to their knees and planted hundreds upon hundreds of bulbs donated to the garden by caladium grower Bates Sons and Daughters of Lake Placid, Florida. In business for over 65 years, Bates' caladiums are known throughout the horticultural industry for their quality, size, and vigor. Their website is a wealth of information. Visit www.caladiumsonline.com.

Pages



Main menu 2

by Dr. Radut